BX of Napa Wines - In progress: please sit back & have wine w/me while I work...
RSS Follow Become a Fan

Delivered by FeedBurner


Recent Posts

Drinking Wine is Better Than Going to the Gym, According to Scientists
Red Wine Makes You Thin!??
Cheers to our HEALTH! Really. "Champagne" [sparkling wines] are good for you
Bex, BX Bubbles, Champagne, Prosseco ... and the town of Prošek
Low-Cal Cocktails (Even Tho Wine is Healthiest)

Categories

aerator
alcoholism
Alzheimer's
antioxidants
archaelogy
biodynamic
calories
cancer
champagne
cholesterol
diabetes
diet
dirt
distribution
doctors
EGCG
European
flavanoids
food pairing
French
French Paradox
gluten
green
HDL
healthy
heart
history
Italy
LDL
Low alcohol
Marketing
organic
osteoporosis
phenolics
Pinot Grigio
polyphenols
Portugal
pregnancy
procyanidins
religion
resveratrol
saponins
SIRT1
sirtuin
snobbery
social media
STACs
sulfites
sustainable
tannin
trend
UK
Vinho Verde
Wine Genome Project
powered by

Wine Health with Bex Bishop, Winemaker at BX of Napa

champagne

Cheers to our HEALTH! Really. "Champagne" [sparkling wines] are good for you

BX BUBBLES Blanc de Noirs Brut contains pinot noir black wine grapes which were essential ingredients to the results of the study. Make sure you don't mistake any bottle of fizz for the proper stuff, but seek the pinot noir components of bubbles.

I love it when good news comes from new research. So let's celebrate! No, really, I mean the research says it's healthy to pop the cork on that Blanc de Noirs, regularly, and celebrate. The newest buzz is a study about SPARKLING WINE - shortened in our English vernacular slang to CHAMPAGNE (one word is better than two?) which in actuality only applies to sparkling wines from the Champagne region of France. But the point of this study's finds relates to all BUBBLES (my one word answer to sparkling wines of the world) that contain black wine grapes such as pinot noir. 

So what's the news on it? That's it actually HEALTHY to have ... 3 glasses of bubbles a week, even better than none! Now we can truly say CHEERS TO OUR HEALTH over that gorgeous flickering tulip flute.

Here are a few articles on this topic. Two points to keep in mind:

  • The research points to bubbles made from black grapes so look for bottles labeled "Blanc de Noirs" which means pinot noir grapes went into it (though not necessarily 100%). SHAMELESS PLUG: BX BUBBLES ARE BLANC DE NOIRS!
  • This study was conducted on lab rats (lucky rats!)


____________________________________________________________________

by Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com – Your Universe Online

Researchers from Reading University have found that three glasses of champagne per week could help prevent the onset of brain disorders such as dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. The team discovered that a compound found in black wine grapes (Pinot noir and Pinot meunier) help fight forgetfulness.

Champagne, which is made using these types of grapes, could now be just the right beverage for tackling dementia before it has a chance to set in. This is not the first time the bubbly has been touted for its health benefits. The same Reading team found in 2009 that champagne is good for the heart and blood circulation.

The memory-helping compound in champagne, however, is much different: phenolic acid. About 80 percent of all champagne is made from the two black grape varieties blended together with a white Chardonnay grape. The researchers, led by Jimmy Spencer, a biochemistry professor at Reading, found that phenolic acid provokes a noticeable boost to spatial memory, allowing the ability to recognize surroundings and help people find their way home.

___________________________________________________________________

By Victoria Ward for The Telegraph UK

Prof Spencer told the Mail on Sunday: "The results were dramatic. After rats consumed champagne regularly, there was a 200 per cent increase of proteins important for determining effective memory. This occurred in rats after just six weeks. We think it would take about three years in humans.
___________________________________________________________________


The study showed three glasses of sparkling wine a day improved memory and could theoretically hinder brain disorders such as dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Further study is required (we call dibs), but it appears the compound found in the black grapes (pinot noir and pinot meunier) used for these wines are the key. These are the same saintly, Nobel Prize-deserving researchers who discovered champagne has similar heart benefits to cocoa (read: chocolate) and red wine. How do you say "happiest lab on Earth" in Swedish?
____________________________________________________________________

Cheers! Now *POP* that bottle of BX Bubbles Blanc de Noirs!
____________________________

Bex, BX Bubbles, Champagne, Prosseco ... and the town of Prošek

Another article hitting home... this one about wine law.

I am intimately familiar with trademark law and wine. I have my own story on why I am no longer my 8 year company name of "Bex of Napa" but now I am reduced to a company without an "e" and go by "BX of Napa". But that's a longer story and not one that is the result of an international agreement but rather a personal one with a big wine company that went back on their word. But I digress... 

However, many Americans have somewhere along the way heard about how we can't call our sparkling wines "champagne" anymore. To be called "Champagne" a sparkling wine must be MADE IN AND FROM the French region of Champagne. Americans should not take national offense, because even the next door region to Champagne, the famed Burgundy (or Bourgogne) is not allowed to call their bubbles Champagne, either. Burgundians and other French regions have instead used a differentiated naming device: "Cremant" even though the exact same methods and neighboring grapes are used. [Note my sparkling wine is "BX Bubbles" because I found "sparkling wine" rather dull and uninspiring.]

You can learn more about Champagne and regulations here. Champagne is regulated better than a stock exchange! I spent some fascinating time with them in Champagne learning the history, regulations and governing bodies -- and that merely scratched the surface. Highly complex!

An international agreement was reached that alcoholic beverages named after a geographic region that invented/inspired/created/is known for them, shall be limited to those single regions, hereto forward. Another example of regional/geographical international naming protection is a favored dessert wine we refer to as "Port". Yes, originally developed in Portugal, but a beverage term all dessert wine lovers know, now -- any other region in the world using those same techniques to produce similarly tasting wines can only use terms like "Port-styled" dessert wine, rather that "Port". 

Cognac is the most famous of brandies, but also a region in France that claims to grow the highest quality grapes for these purposes (brandy is distilled grapes or fruit juice) -- and thus, other regions may allude to Cognac - whose spirits have wider global familiarity like Champagne -- but can only be called brandy.

All this to say, it is not surprising that a town, while geographical, is unfortunate enough to have a name to similar to an another beverage type, is not allowed to use their own name. Cuz, I'm Bex Bishop, but someone else owns my name - so you can just call me BX for short.

The sad truth is that Croatia, like Bex Bishop, doesn't carry the political [read monetary] clout of the larger entities that want their own ideas protected. You have my empathy Croatia.
____________________________________________________________________

What’s in a Name: Prošek v. Prosecco
The Story of Prošek Wine and Croatia’s Membership in the EU

by LINDSEY A. ZAHN

An article covering perhaps my favorite topic (intellectual property) in wine law emerged this last week. Unfortunately, or fortunately for On Reserve, the topic did not receive much attention amid major wine publications, but its content does not fail to intrigue at all (at least, not in my opinion). With Croatia’s accession to the European Union scheduled to occur this July, requirements such as the EU’s strict appellation rules must be followed by the joining country. 

Unfortunately—from the perspective of many Croatian winemakers—the beloved wine called Prošek will ceased to be bottled as such starting July 1, 2013. (See EU Prošek Ban Angers Croatian Winemakers – “Vino Dalmato” Replacement Term?) In March, “the [Croatian] agriculture ministry suddenly announced the traditional sweet dessert wine known as Prošek could no longer be sold under its name.” (Croatian Winemakers Upset by EU Label Rules.) Accordingly, in its negotiations, the EU claimed that the Croatian wine named Prošek is too similar to the name of to the effervescent Prosecco produced in Italy’s Veneto and Friuli Venezia Giulia wine regions. 

Prosecco currently enjoys legal protection under EU rules that govern other wines like Champagne and Port. The battle against Prošek draws a strong correlation to those endless crusades dueled by many Champagne producers: the demand for truth in labeling and place of origin.

While the names of the wines Prošek and Prosecco may linguistically be similar, the onset between these two wines is quite different from those fought by Champagne. Most, if not all, of the Champagne region’s battles seek to discontinue the use of the term “Champagne” on wine products that do not originate from the region. Most significantly, these wines are usually sparkling wines produced outside of Champagne, France and use the term “Champagne” to describe the style of the wine (or, in some cases, to feed off of the name Champagne and the region’s well-established wine products). Similar notions are seen for dessert wines like Port and Sherry. 

However, what is quite different in Prošek v. Prosecco is the fact that Prošek is actually a sweet dessert wine produced for centuries in Dalmatia and is not an effervescent wine, like Prosecco. (See EU madness hits Croatia: No More Prošek From July 1.) The two wines are also produced by exceptionally different methods, Prošek through the passito method and composed typically of grapes native to Croatia and Prosecco through the Charmat method (which requires a second fermentation).

Croatia filed an application to protect the term Prošek, but the European Commission requested that the Ministry withdraw said request. Not much is known about the EC’s request or why Croatia’s Ministry of Agriculture failed to explain the EC’s request to Croatian winemakers timely. “Unless Croatia manages to prove the difference and get the ban lifted, the local producers will have to change its name . . . .” (Croatian Winemakers Upset by EU Label Rules.) Unfortunately for Croatia, “[o]nly a few weeks later, Slovenia said Croatia had no right to produce and market teran, a red wine made in the northern tip of the Adriatic, shared by Italy, Slovenia and Croatia.” (Id.)  


Only Red Wine Health? Think Again: Benefits of Champagne

And by champagne, we of course mean the category of all sparkling wines.... Red wine always gets the props for "wine health" but did you know that sparkling wine also has great benefits? Mind you, sparkling wine is higher in calories, but you're still boosting your body while enjoying one of life's most luxurious indulgences. So cheers to you next time you're enjoying my BX Bubbles Blanc de Noirs Brut -- consider it a work out with pleasure!
____________________________________________________________________

BUBBLES FOR MIND AND BODY BLISS
I asked my friend, nationally recognized nutrition expert and published author Keri Glassman, to weigh in on how indulging in a little champagne can offer better health.

Lowers blood pressure
Glassman shares that in 2009, research from the British Journal of Nutrition found that champagne has health benefits similar to those often attributed to red wine. ...  "However, only the champagne drinkers experienced a slower removal of nitric oxide from their blood." What does this mean? "Sipping a few glasses of champagne may lower blood pressure and potentially reduce your risk of stroke and heart disease."

Contains antioxidants
When you’re enjoying that mimosa with brunch, pat yourself on the back, because champagne contains antioxidants – "powerful nutrients that work to contain the damage caused by free-roaming radicals in our bodies," according to Glassman. "Free-roaming radicals are often linked to disease, fatigue and weight gain. Antioxidants are important because they 'quench' these radicals and help protect our cells from damage and death. "Champagne and red wines both contain high levels of polyphenols, a kind of antioxidant. But unlike red wine, champagne is high in a specific form of polyphenol that has been shown to defend nerve cells from injury... Pairing champagne with orange, grapefruit or cranberry juice also ups the antioxidant ante and makes for a most charming cocktail.

Boosts your mood
I had no idea that champagne also offers us a mental boost (isn’t that awesome?), but Glassman says "just a few glasses of champagne can [help] protect your brain from damage that is commonly associated with Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s, and stroke... 

Recipes with Champagne...

Holiday drinks: Good cheer, but watch the calories

Whether it's hot buttered rum or spiced apple cider, find out how many calories are in your holiday drink favorites.
Your family's seasonal celebrations may not be complete without festive holiday drinks — mulled red wine, homemade hot cocoa, chilled champagne or creamy eggnog. Because many of these drinks can add extra calories and fat, though, continue to get regular exercise, limit your indulgences and try healthier options when possible. For instance, you can find reduced-fat and sugar-free versions of many drinks, including eggnog and cocoa — and you don't need to feel like a Scrooge for doing it.  So as you serve up a bit of holiday cheer this year, keep in mind these calorie counts.