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Drinking Wine is Better Than Going to the Gym, According to Scientists
Red Wine Makes You Thin!??
Cheers to our HEALTH! Really. "Champagne" [sparkling wines] are good for you
Bex, BX Bubbles, Champagne, Prosseco ... and the town of Prošek
Low-Cal Cocktails (Even Tho Wine is Healthiest)

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Drinking Wine is Better Than Going to the Gym, According to Scientists

Well I was going to work out but then I thought I'd do myself a favor and poured myself a glass of BX of Napa Wine instead. The scientists told me too!
 
What great news is this?? Thanks University of Alberta, Canada!
 
What they are referring to is the presence of RESVERATROL improving heart, muscle & bone functions; as well as ANTIOXIDANTS which improve cholesterol, heart health & blood flow.
 
They mention wine cutting risks of cataracts, colon cancer and Type 2 Diabetes.
 
But let's be serious - we know the gym provides benefits too, so let's compromise... Pour yourself a nice glass of wine and take a walk on the treadmill. Work those biceps everytime you take a sip. Be sure to pour a big glass for extra weight.
 
Cheers!
 
 

Red Wine Compound Activates Gene Needed for Healthy Cells

More on the debate on the effectiveness and amount of resveratrol in humans...
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Harvard scientists said they have settled a debate over whether a compound found in red wine activates a gene that keeps cells healthy.

Researchers repeated a 10-year old study using a new method to validate earlier findings that resveratrol turns on a gene that recharges mitochondria, tiny structures that produce fuel for cells. By revving up mitochondria, the agent may protect against aging-related diseases, said David Sinclair, a Harvard Medical School genetics professor and the study’s senior author.

Sinclair’s earlier research was disputed in studies in 2009 and 2010 saying that resveratrol only activated the gene, a sirtuin called SIRT1, in experiments that used a synthetic fluorescent chemical to track activity. Since these chemicals aren’t found in cells or nature, other studies said the effect would only work in lab tests and not in humans. The new study, published today in the journal Science, got rid of the chemical.

“Controversy is a difficult thing to deal with, and I hope this paper gives some clarity to the field,” Sinclair said in a telephone interview.

The Harvard group set out to see if the effect was an artifact of the synthetic chemicals or was something that occurred naturally as well. They swapped out the fluorescent chemicals for a group of naturally occurring amino acids, including tryptophan, and found resveratrol did activate SIRT1.

Resveratrol Drugs
Sinclair’s earlier work led to the formation of Sirtris Pharmaceuticals which focuses on developing drugs from resveratrol. GlaxoSmithKline Plc (GSK) acquired the company in 2008 for $720 million. A little more than two years later, Glaxo shelved development of the lead compound from that acquisition, SRT501, when the medicine didn’t appear to work well enough in cancer patients and worsened kidney damage.

Resveratrol is currently being tested in at least two dozen clinical trials to gauge its effects on human health. It’s also packaged as a natural supplement, with $34 million in U.S. sales last year, according to the Nutrition Business Journal.

Further doubt was cast on resveratrol’s abilities after a prominent researcher and promoter of the compound, Dipak Das, who was the director of the University of Connecticut Health Center’s cardiovascular research center, was found to have fabricated and falsified data in numerous studies...

To contact the reporter on this story: Ryan Flinn in San Francisco at rflinn@bloomberg.net



Mayo Clinic: Red wine and resveratrol: Good for your heart?

Red wine and something in red wine called resveratrol might be heart healthy. Find out the facts, and hype, regarding red wine and its impact on your heart.  By Mayo Clinic staff

Red wine, in moderation, has long been thought of as heart healthy. The alcohol and certain substances in red wine called antioxidants may help prevent heart disease by increasing levels of "good" cholesterol and protecting against artery damage. While the news about red wine might sound great if you enjoy a glass of red wine with your evening meal, doctors are wary of encouraging anyone to start drinking alcohol. That's because too much alcohol can have many harmful effects on your body...

How is red wine heart healthy?
...Antioxidants in red wine called polyphenols may help protect the lining of blood vessels in your heart. A polyphenol called resveratrol is one substance in red wine that's gotten attention.

Resveratrol in red wine
Resveratrol might be a key ingredient in red wine that helps prevent damage to blood vessels, reduces "bad" cholesterol and prevents blood clots. Research in mice given resveratrol suggests that the antioxidant might also help protect them from obesity and diabetes, both of which are strong risk factors for heart disease. However, those findings were reported only in mice, not in people. In addition, to get the same dose of resveratrol used in the mice studies, a person would have to drink over 60 liters of red wine every day. Some research shows that resveratrol could be linked to a reduced risk of inflammation and blood clotting, both of which can lead to heart disease...

Resveratrol in grapes, supplements and other foods
The resveratrol in red wine comes from the skin of grapes used to make wine. Because red wine is fermented with grape skins longer than is white wine, red wine contains more resveratrol. Simply eating grapes, or drinking grape juice, has been suggested as one way to get resveratrol without drinking alcohol. Red and purple grape juices may have some of the same heart-healthy benefits of red wine. Other foods that contain some resveratrol include peanuts, blueberries and cranberries...

How does alcohol help the heart?
Various studies have shown that moderate amounts of all types of alcohol benefit your heart, not just alcohol found in red wine. It's thought that alcohol:
  • Raises high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, the "good" cholesterol
  • Reduces the formation of blood clots
  • Helps prevent artery damage caused by high levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, the "bad" cholesterol

Drink in moderation — or not at all
Red wine's potential heart-healthy benefits look promising. Those who drink moderate amounts of alcohol, including red wine, seem to have a lower risk of heart disease... Neither the American Heart Association nor the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute recommend that you start drinking alcohol just to prevent heart disease. Alcohol can be addictive and can cause or worsen other health problems.

Drinking too much increases your risk of high blood pressure, high triglycerides, liver damage, obesity, certain types of cancer, accidents and other problems. In addition, drinking too much alcohol regularly can cause cardiomyopathy — weakened heart muscle — causing symptoms of heart failure in some people. If you have heart failure or a weak heart, you should avoid alcohol completely. If you take aspirin daily, you should avoid or limit alcohol, depending on your doctor's advice. You also shouldn't drink alcohol if you're pregnant. 

If you already drink red wine, do so in moderation. Moderate drinking is defined as an average of two drinks a day for men and one drink a day for women. The limit for men is higher because men generally weigh more and have more of an enzyme that metabolizes alcohol than women do. A drink is defined as 12 ounces (355 milliliters, or mL) of beer, 5 ounces (148 mL) of wine or 1.5 ounces (44 mL) of 80-proof distilled spirits.


7 Health Benefits of Drinking Red Wine

We talk about heart health, cholesterol levels, arteries and fighting the development of cancer, but did you know RED wine is good for WHITE teeth? Not sure I agree with the 40 WINKS, however. Note this was posted in Yahoo! India.
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Don’t feel guilty the next time your order a bottle of a Shiraz or a Pinot Noir for your dinner date. It may actually prove to be good for your health.

For years, researchers have puzzled over the ‘French Paradox’. The French have relatively low levels of cholesterol and less cases of heart disease, despite of the fact that their cuisine has high levels of saturated fat. Many studies suggest that that the French are healthy due to the presence of red wine in their diet. So, now that the secret is out, why not use it to the fullest? Here are some of the health benefits of enjoying an occasional glass of red wine.

Prevents tooth decay

For a perfect set of pearly whites, you should drink red wine. It hardens your enamel which in turn prevents tooth decay and the growth of bacteria. Polyphenols, something which is found in red wine, can reduce gum inflammation and prevent gum diseases. 



HEALTHY DIET: Key to healthy heart- olive oil, nuts, wine & chocolate

Bex diet notes: What's better than finding out that delicious foods are healthy? Find many delicious & healthy recipes to pair with BX of Napa Wines on the tab to the left!

Switching to a diet rich in olive oil, nuts, beans, fish, fruit, vegetables, and even some wine and chocolate can slash your risk of heart attack, stroke, and death from heart disease. That's the conclusion of a landmark study out this week in the New England of Medicine.

The benefit was so great--a 30 percent reduction in risk, even among people at high risk, many of whom were already taking drugs for high blood pressure and cholesterol levels...

...What part of the diet was most important? The benefit likely comes from the combination working together, not any one food.

...Those who drink wine should aim for about seven glasses a week, with meals. Oh, you can also eat as much chocolate as you like, as long as it's at least 50 percent cocoa.

IS THERE ANYTHING WINE CAN'T DO?

A host of reasons to drink red wine, but please, not 1000 bottles...

...the Yale-New Haven hospital talks up the benefits of the drink, pointing to its effects on heart-health. Researchers included moderate alcohol consumption as one of the "eight proven ways to reduce coronary heart disease risk.

...And the magical powers of wine extend beyond your cardiovascular system. WebMD physician, Arthur Agatston, also touted alcohol's benefits on cholesterol,  telling CBS, "The research evidence points to ethanol, or the alcohol component, of beer, wine, or spirits as the substrate that can help lower cholesterol levels, increase 'good' HDL cholesterol." Studies have also shown that that same ingredient that helps the lazy might also benefit the aging... 

Resveratrol Science Hits a Wall

A top resveratrol researcher from Harvard, David Sinclair, found a few years ago that resveratrol may mimic the effect of caloric restriction in humans. This is the only known way to extend life, Das writes in his study. Not to be confused with starvation, which increases metabolism and therefore hastens death, caloric restriction involves controlled limited calorie intake. (It appears to activate a genetic response that extends life when food is scarce, allowing animals to survive until supplies improve and they can reproduce.)

..."Resveratrol is so powerful it can activate stem-cell survival," Dipak Das, a researcher at the University of Connecticut’s Cardiovascular Research Center, said. "So why is it not extending lifespan, by improving the survivability of genes?"...

For whole story go here: http://goo.gl/jpBPS

Saponins, Anyone? Another Chemical in Red Wine Fights Cholesterol

If you enjoy sharing a glass of a nice red wine with friends and family, you may be working on reducing your cholesterol while you're relaxing. Scientists at the University of California, Davis, think that a group of chemicals in red wine, called saponins, are linked to the ability to lower cholesterol. If you have been following the discussions on the French paradox you are already familiar with the link between red wine and reduced risk of heart disease. ..Yet it seems that folks who grow up in France tend to have less clogged arteries and are less obese than Americans or Brits. For years this has been attributed to red wines' health benefits – specifically the compounds catechins and resveratrol, called polyphenols, found in red wine. These chemicals also have antioxidant or anticancer properties.

Andrew Waterhouse, Ph.D., Professor of Enology at UC Davis, an expert in wine chemistry, says that saponins are being found in an increasing number of foods and their presence in wine adds to the mounting evidence that red wine really may make a difference in lowering your cholesterol. "Saponins are a hot new food ingredient. People are just starting to pay attention to it," says Waterhouse. It seems that red wine contains about three to ten times as much saponin as white. This is probably because the saponins are found in the skins of the grapes and red wines have longer contact with their skins in the fermentation process.

The tests showed that the Red Zinfandel has the highest levels of saponins followed by Syrah. Both Pinot Noir and Cabernet Sauvignon had about the same amount. No other red wines were tested, but scientists believe that most red wines contain significant amounts of this chemical.

Red vs White wine - is there a difference in health benefit?

So why are the antioxidant molecules in white wine apparently more effective than those found in red wines even though they are present in greater numbers in red wines?
The answer lies in the research of Dr. Troup, a physicist at Monash University in Melbourne. Dr. Troup used an electron spin resonance spectroscope to examine the actual size of the various antioxidant molecules in wine and showed that those in white wine are smaller and thus more effective because they can be more easily absorbed.
 
...Returning to the 'French Paradox'. Reynaud observed that the French, despite eating a vascular disease-predisposing cholesterol rich diet, have significantly less coronary heart disease than other similarly indulgent countries. The reason for this, according to Reynaud is due largely to France's high consumption of wine...
 
It has been well documented that consuming alcohol in moderation can reduce mortality from all causes by 30-50% (1) due, mainly, to reducing our society's biggest killer, cardiovascular disease by up to 50% (2) and cancer by up to 24% (3). It is also good for relieving society's other big disease group - stress related illness.
 
 

Is wine good for you? In moderation, a glass or two can help your heart, prevent cancer and more

 
Is wine good for you? In moderation and as part of an overall healthy diet, the short answer is yes! Thanks to its alcohol content and non-alcoholic phytochemicals (natural occurring plant compounds), wine has been shown to reduce the risk of heart disease, certain cancers and slow the progression of neurological degenerative disorders like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Disease.
 
...Non-alcoholic phytochemicals in wine, such as flavanoids and resveratrol, act as antioxidants and prevent molecules known as “free radicals” from causing cellular damage in the body.
 

Red wine and resveratrol: Good for your heart?

 
Red wine, in moderation, has long been thought of as heart healthy. The alcohol and certain substances in red wine called antioxidants may help prevent heart disease by increasing levels of "good" cholesterol and protecting against artery damage.
Antioxidants in red wine called polyphenols may help protect the lining of blood vessels in your heart.
A polyphenol called resveratrol is one substance in red wine that's gotten attention.
How does alcohol help the heart?
Various studies have shown that moderate amounts of all types of alcohol benefit your heart, not just alcohol found in red wine. It's thought that alcohol:
  • Raises high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, the "good" cholesterol
  • Reduces the formation of blood clots
  • Helps prevent artery damage caused by high levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, the "bad" cholesterol