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Drinking Wine is Better Than Going to the Gym, According to Scientists
Red Wine Makes You Thin!??
Cheers to our HEALTH! Really. "Champagne" [sparkling wines] are good for you
Bex, BX Bubbles, Champagne, Prosseco ... and the town of Prošek
Low-Cal Cocktails (Even Tho Wine is Healthiest)

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Wine Health with Bex Bishop, Winemaker at BX of Napa

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Drinking Wine is Better Than Going to the Gym, According to Scientists

Well I was going to work out but then I thought I'd do myself a favor and poured myself a glass of BX of Napa Wine instead. The scientists told me too!
 
What great news is this?? Thanks University of Alberta, Canada!
 
What they are referring to is the presence of RESVERATROL improving heart, muscle & bone functions; as well as ANTIOXIDANTS which improve cholesterol, heart health & blood flow.
 
They mention wine cutting risks of cataracts, colon cancer and Type 2 Diabetes.
 
But let's be serious - we know the gym provides benefits too, so let's compromise... Pour yourself a nice glass of wine and take a walk on the treadmill. Work those biceps everytime you take a sip. Be sure to pour a big glass for extra weight.
 
Cheers!
 
 

Cheers to our HEALTH! Really. "Champagne" [sparkling wines] are good for you

BX BUBBLES Blanc de Noirs Brut contains pinot noir black wine grapes which were essential ingredients to the results of the study. Make sure you don't mistake any bottle of fizz for the proper stuff, but seek the pinot noir components of bubbles.

I love it when good news comes from new research. So let's celebrate! No, really, I mean the research says it's healthy to pop the cork on that Blanc de Noirs, regularly, and celebrate. The newest buzz is a study about SPARKLING WINE - shortened in our English vernacular slang to CHAMPAGNE (one word is better than two?) which in actuality only applies to sparkling wines from the Champagne region of France. But the point of this study's finds relates to all BUBBLES (my one word answer to sparkling wines of the world) that contain black wine grapes such as pinot noir. 

So what's the news on it? That's it actually HEALTHY to have ... 3 glasses of bubbles a week, even better than none! Now we can truly say CHEERS TO OUR HEALTH over that gorgeous flickering tulip flute.

Here are a few articles on this topic. Two points to keep in mind:

  • The research points to bubbles made from black grapes so look for bottles labeled "Blanc de Noirs" which means pinot noir grapes went into it (though not necessarily 100%). SHAMELESS PLUG: BX BUBBLES ARE BLANC DE NOIRS!
  • This study was conducted on lab rats (lucky rats!)


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by Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com – Your Universe Online

Researchers from Reading University have found that three glasses of champagne per week could help prevent the onset of brain disorders such as dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. The team discovered that a compound found in black wine grapes (Pinot noir and Pinot meunier) help fight forgetfulness.

Champagne, which is made using these types of grapes, could now be just the right beverage for tackling dementia before it has a chance to set in. This is not the first time the bubbly has been touted for its health benefits. The same Reading team found in 2009 that champagne is good for the heart and blood circulation.

The memory-helping compound in champagne, however, is much different: phenolic acid. About 80 percent of all champagne is made from the two black grape varieties blended together with a white Chardonnay grape. The researchers, led by Jimmy Spencer, a biochemistry professor at Reading, found that phenolic acid provokes a noticeable boost to spatial memory, allowing the ability to recognize surroundings and help people find their way home.

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By Victoria Ward for The Telegraph UK

Prof Spencer told the Mail on Sunday: "The results were dramatic. After rats consumed champagne regularly, there was a 200 per cent increase of proteins important for determining effective memory. This occurred in rats after just six weeks. We think it would take about three years in humans.
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The study showed three glasses of sparkling wine a day improved memory and could theoretically hinder brain disorders such as dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Further study is required (we call dibs), but it appears the compound found in the black grapes (pinot noir and pinot meunier) used for these wines are the key. These are the same saintly, Nobel Prize-deserving researchers who discovered champagne has similar heart benefits to cocoa (read: chocolate) and red wine. How do you say "happiest lab on Earth" in Swedish?
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Cheers! Now *POP* that bottle of BX Bubbles Blanc de Noirs!
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Low-Cal Cocktails (Even Tho Wine is Healthiest)


OK, so we've validated that wine has health benefits, and that it's for the most part, the healthiest alcoholic beverage choice. However, I admit, there are times you want to explore some other options. Summer time, pool time, outdoor patios are perfect for wine but might lack that mint sprig or pretty umbrella you need to give you that mental feeling of "relaxation time". But the problem is that hard liquor drinks carry so many more calories, in their liquor content and most auspiciously in the cocktail cohorts making up those frilly flavors. So here is a list of cocktails, departing from the obvious choice ofwine being naturally lower in calories, that provide alternative dressings for lower calorie concoctions...
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Watermelon Mojito: 100 Calories
A whole day of eating right can go down in the swirl of cocktail -- with crazy-high calories and weakened willpower. So we've put a few drinks on a diet, starting with the Cuban mojito. Instead of using sugar, use a wooden pestle or a big spoon to gently crush cubes of watermelon with fresh mint leaves. Add rum and sparkling water for a sweet mojito with half the usual calories.

Skinny Piña Colada: 229 Calories

Rum that's infused with a coconut flavor can cut about 300 calories from a piña colada. What's out? The sugary, coconut milk mix. Measure one shot of coconut rum. Then add fresh strawberries, a splash of agave syrup, and blend with ice. You get a tall, 12-ounce tropical cocktail for about the same calories as in a handful of pretzel twists.

Shochu Cosmo: 70 Calories

Make a super-slim cosmopolitan by replacing the vodka with shochu, a Japanese spirit with a smooth flavor. A 2-ounce serving has only about 35 calories. Add splashes of diet cranberry juice, fresh lime juice, and orange juice, and then toss in a martini shaker. This cosmo shakes out at half the calories of a traditional cosmopolitan.

Skinny Vodka Iced Tea: 80 Calories

The mix of lemonade and sweet iced tea, favored by golfer Arnold Palmer, becomes a popular cocktail when you add a shot of vodka. You can slice off half the calories in this tall, cool drink by using low-calorie lemonade and sweet-tea-flavored vodka. This specialty vodka is lower in calories than traditional types.


Slim Berry Daiquiri: 145 Calories

Simple, unadorned berries can help slim down a strawberry daiquiri. Start with 1 cup of no-sugar-added berries, either fresh or frozen. You get intense berry flavor for just 50 calories, compared with 255 calories in berries frozen with syrup. Add rum, ice, and sweeten the deal with 1 teaspoon of stevia, a sugar substitute. Blend into a slim and delicious frozen concoction.

Find more cocktails and the full slide show here:


Winey Whiners About Wine Health Claims

BEX PRE-ARTICLE NOTE: 
This one is personal! People are mad that scientists focus on the health benefits of wine, as  lopsided representation if in a conference. I am pretty sure that the bad effects of alcohol have been communicated to all living members of the public. It's no secret. That's alcohol. But what this article misses is the concept of differentiation of the health qualities in wine VERSUS other alcohols which have less or no positive effects. Nobody is suggesting we give up our meals and drink wine all day... as enticing as that may sound on occasion. It's known and repeated that moderation is key.

But the point of my blog and this conference I can only assume is to explore the glorious facets of this beautiful little fermented fruit juice and the fact that it does offer health benefits alongside its joyous accompaniment to our time with friends and loved ones. We're not calling it medicine, though if it were, it would be the most delicious one around! But if you go out to dinner and consider a gin martini appertif versus wine - you'll do your body more justice with the wine, if not  your taste buds too. If you are one to have a daily drink at the end of the work day, they say having a glass of wine versus beer or none at all is the healthiest choice.

Sharing the health benefits and research of scientists as related to wine is to me, a great public service. If we can move someone from hard liquor to fine wine, that's better for their health, both emotionally and physically. It's not just about the beverage choice, but the environment that corresponds and follows one's beverage choice. Wine in general sports a healthier and more moderated atmosphere than one filled with hard liquor. And if it is filled with beer, it is also likely filled with beer bellies.

And just like saying what you feel is an important part of life, so is a glass or two of wine per day, and both should be well crafted and in moderation.
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Distaste arises on wine health claims

Public health experts have branded a ''wine health'' conference a misleading industry attempt to influence government policy by presenting one-sided evidence on wine's health benefits. Run by the Australian Wine Research Institute, a body which ''supports grape and wine producers'', the July conference in Sydney will host world experts for ''stimulating exchange of scientific information'' on the health impacts of drinking wine.

Professor Mike Daube, director of the McCusker Centre for Action on Alcohol and Youth, said he was concerned that evidence of the negative health effects of drinking would not be presented at the conference. ''At a time when there is so much concern about problems caused by alcohol, here we have a group that by promoting the message that wine is healthy is trying to influence the public policy debate. Nobody should see this as objective science. It's all pretty shonky,'' Professor Daube said.

''The National Health and Medical Research Council guidelines are clear that any health benefits of wine have probably been overestimated, are mainly related to middle-aged or older people, only occur at levels of around half a drink a day anyway, and that people should not be encouraged to drink for health benefits.

''Conference chair Creina Stockley, from the Australian Wine Research Institute, described the criticism of the event as ''nonsense''. She said speakers would not be paid for their appearance, they were all scientists, and that research on positive and negative health effects of wine consumption would be discussed...

Brian Vandenberg, senior policy adviser at Cancer Council Victoria, said the event reflected ''panic'' in the wine industry. ''They're getting desperate as consumers become more aware of the risks of alcohol so they're making more claims about the health benefits,'' he said.''We saw that with low-carb beers. When health groups pointed out that they're just as fattening as regular beer, sales dropped pretty massively.

''Alcohol is packed with kilojoules, it leads to weight gain and it's linked to many cancers, so a conference about the health benefits of wine is about as credible as a conference about the health benefits of smoking or saturated fat...


Mayo Clinic: Red wine and resveratrol: Good for your heart?

Red wine and something in red wine called resveratrol might be heart healthy. Find out the facts, and hype, regarding red wine and its impact on your heart.  By Mayo Clinic staff

Red wine, in moderation, has long been thought of as heart healthy. The alcohol and certain substances in red wine called antioxidants may help prevent heart disease by increasing levels of "good" cholesterol and protecting against artery damage. While the news about red wine might sound great if you enjoy a glass of red wine with your evening meal, doctors are wary of encouraging anyone to start drinking alcohol. That's because too much alcohol can have many harmful effects on your body...

How is red wine heart healthy?
...Antioxidants in red wine called polyphenols may help protect the lining of blood vessels in your heart. A polyphenol called resveratrol is one substance in red wine that's gotten attention.

Resveratrol in red wine
Resveratrol might be a key ingredient in red wine that helps prevent damage to blood vessels, reduces "bad" cholesterol and prevents blood clots. Research in mice given resveratrol suggests that the antioxidant might also help protect them from obesity and diabetes, both of which are strong risk factors for heart disease. However, those findings were reported only in mice, not in people. In addition, to get the same dose of resveratrol used in the mice studies, a person would have to drink over 60 liters of red wine every day. Some research shows that resveratrol could be linked to a reduced risk of inflammation and blood clotting, both of which can lead to heart disease...

Resveratrol in grapes, supplements and other foods
The resveratrol in red wine comes from the skin of grapes used to make wine. Because red wine is fermented with grape skins longer than is white wine, red wine contains more resveratrol. Simply eating grapes, or drinking grape juice, has been suggested as one way to get resveratrol without drinking alcohol. Red and purple grape juices may have some of the same heart-healthy benefits of red wine. Other foods that contain some resveratrol include peanuts, blueberries and cranberries...

How does alcohol help the heart?
Various studies have shown that moderate amounts of all types of alcohol benefit your heart, not just alcohol found in red wine. It's thought that alcohol:
  • Raises high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, the "good" cholesterol
  • Reduces the formation of blood clots
  • Helps prevent artery damage caused by high levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, the "bad" cholesterol

Drink in moderation — or not at all
Red wine's potential heart-healthy benefits look promising. Those who drink moderate amounts of alcohol, including red wine, seem to have a lower risk of heart disease... Neither the American Heart Association nor the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute recommend that you start drinking alcohol just to prevent heart disease. Alcohol can be addictive and can cause or worsen other health problems.

Drinking too much increases your risk of high blood pressure, high triglycerides, liver damage, obesity, certain types of cancer, accidents and other problems. In addition, drinking too much alcohol regularly can cause cardiomyopathy — weakened heart muscle — causing symptoms of heart failure in some people. If you have heart failure or a weak heart, you should avoid alcohol completely. If you take aspirin daily, you should avoid or limit alcohol, depending on your doctor's advice. You also shouldn't drink alcohol if you're pregnant. 

If you already drink red wine, do so in moderation. Moderate drinking is defined as an average of two drinks a day for men and one drink a day for women. The limit for men is higher because men generally weigh more and have more of an enzyme that metabolizes alcohol than women do. A drink is defined as 12 ounces (355 milliliters, or mL) of beer, 5 ounces (148 mL) of wine or 1.5 ounces (44 mL) of 80-proof distilled spirits.


Calories in Wine vs Beer (Infographic)

Bex notes:    There is a joke in the wine industry that's not so much a joke: What does a winemaker want at the end of a long work day? A beer. So no hard feelings against it, but as most of  the articles below highlight, wine is full of so much more than calories, alcohol and relaxation but also many, many benefits. But sometimes, you just want a cool frothy one. I'm a fan of the rich and dark Belgians but those are also higher in calories. If you're a Bud/Coors/Miller Lite drinker, congratulations, you're consuming the least calories in the beer category. But then again, if you're a american beer lite drinker, you're probably not reading my blog. Am I wrong?

So I ask you, as a wine drinker, when you drink beer, why do you choose beer and which type do you choose?
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Calories in Wine vs Beer (Infographic)

Calories in Wine vs Beer
Since the FDA doesn’t require nutrition facts on alcoholic beverages it’s very difficult to understand how much a drink will cost your diet plan. 

...Every drink, whether it be beer, wine or liquor is some combination of alcohol calories, sugar calories and sometimes fat calories

Health Benefits of Wine and Beer
Both beer and wine have some added benefits to drinkers that many distilled alcoholic beverages do not. For instance, red wine that is high in tannin contains procyanidins which protect against heart disease. Beer is a significant source of dietary silicon which improves bone density and reduces the risk of osteoporosis.

Not All Wines and Beers Have the Same Calories
Since some beer and wine have a higher alcohol percentage than others, the total calories will vary greatly. A good rule of thumb is to choose the lightest alcohol dry wine or beer in order to have the least calories.



New Chemical Found in Red Wine, EGCG, Could Play Role In Fighting Alzheimer's

I'm pretty excited to read about a newly discovered chemical in red wine that COULD help stave off Alzheimer's! While it is still testing in a lab, the results are very promising for an as of yet incurable and fast increasing, traumatizing disease. This newly discovered chemical is called EGCG and is also found in Green Tea, one of my other favorite healthy beverages. Drink up!
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EGCG, In Green Tea & Red Wine, Could Help Fight Alzheimer's

A new study in the Journal of Biological Chemistry shows that an antioxidant called EGCG, which is found in green tea and red wine, is able to stop amyloid-beta proteins -- known to play a role in Alzheimer's -- from attaching to and killing brain cells in a lab setting. The study is based on the notion that amyloid proteins form ball-like clumps, which are not uniform in size. These amyloid clumps then bind to the outer proteins of brain cells and kill them. However, the researchers wanted to see if changing the shape of the amyloid clumps -- by applying EGCG-- altered their ability to bind to the brain cells. Sure enough, they found that the EGCG could change the shape of the amyloid proteins. And because of that, the amyloid proteins no longer bound to the cells.

...These findings are released at the same time as another study in the journal Neurology, showing that the number of people with Alzheimer's could triple by 2050, MyHealthNewsDaily reported. "It will place a huge burden on society, disabling more people who develop the disease, challenging their caregivers and straining medical and social safety nets," study researcher Jennifer Weuve, who is an assistant professor of medicine at Rush Institute for Healthy Aging, told MyHealthNewsDaily.  

There is currently no cure for Alzheimer's, though there are some medications that can help to stave off the thinking problems associated with the disease, including cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine, according to the Mayo Clinic.


Only Red Wine Health? Think Again: Benefits of Champagne

And by champagne, we of course mean the category of all sparkling wines.... Red wine always gets the props for "wine health" but did you know that sparkling wine also has great benefits? Mind you, sparkling wine is higher in calories, but you're still boosting your body while enjoying one of life's most luxurious indulgences. So cheers to you next time you're enjoying my BX Bubbles Blanc de Noirs Brut -- consider it a work out with pleasure!
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BUBBLES FOR MIND AND BODY BLISS
I asked my friend, nationally recognized nutrition expert and published author Keri Glassman, to weigh in on how indulging in a little champagne can offer better health.

Lowers blood pressure
Glassman shares that in 2009, research from the British Journal of Nutrition found that champagne has health benefits similar to those often attributed to red wine. ...  "However, only the champagne drinkers experienced a slower removal of nitric oxide from their blood." What does this mean? "Sipping a few glasses of champagne may lower blood pressure and potentially reduce your risk of stroke and heart disease."

Contains antioxidants
When you’re enjoying that mimosa with brunch, pat yourself on the back, because champagne contains antioxidants – "powerful nutrients that work to contain the damage caused by free-roaming radicals in our bodies," according to Glassman. "Free-roaming radicals are often linked to disease, fatigue and weight gain. Antioxidants are important because they 'quench' these radicals and help protect our cells from damage and death. "Champagne and red wines both contain high levels of polyphenols, a kind of antioxidant. But unlike red wine, champagne is high in a specific form of polyphenol that has been shown to defend nerve cells from injury... Pairing champagne with orange, grapefruit or cranberry juice also ups the antioxidant ante and makes for a most charming cocktail.

Boosts your mood
I had no idea that champagne also offers us a mental boost (isn’t that awesome?), but Glassman says "just a few glasses of champagne can [help] protect your brain from damage that is commonly associated with Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s, and stroke... 

Recipes with Champagne...

7 Health Benefits of Drinking Red Wine

We talk about heart health, cholesterol levels, arteries and fighting the development of cancer, but did you know RED wine is good for WHITE teeth? Not sure I agree with the 40 WINKS, however. Note this was posted in Yahoo! India.
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Don’t feel guilty the next time your order a bottle of a Shiraz or a Pinot Noir for your dinner date. It may actually prove to be good for your health.

For years, researchers have puzzled over the ‘French Paradox’. The French have relatively low levels of cholesterol and less cases of heart disease, despite of the fact that their cuisine has high levels of saturated fat. Many studies suggest that that the French are healthy due to the presence of red wine in their diet. So, now that the secret is out, why not use it to the fullest? Here are some of the health benefits of enjoying an occasional glass of red wine.

Prevents tooth decay

For a perfect set of pearly whites, you should drink red wine. It hardens your enamel which in turn prevents tooth decay and the growth of bacteria. Polyphenols, something which is found in red wine, can reduce gum inflammation and prevent gum diseases. 



HEALTHY DIET: Key to healthy heart- olive oil, nuts, wine & chocolate

Bex diet notes: What's better than finding out that delicious foods are healthy? Find many delicious & healthy recipes to pair with BX of Napa Wines on the tab to the left!

Switching to a diet rich in olive oil, nuts, beans, fish, fruit, vegetables, and even some wine and chocolate can slash your risk of heart attack, stroke, and death from heart disease. That's the conclusion of a landmark study out this week in the New England of Medicine.

The benefit was so great--a 30 percent reduction in risk, even among people at high risk, many of whom were already taking drugs for high blood pressure and cholesterol levels...

...What part of the diet was most important? The benefit likely comes from the combination working together, not any one food.

...Those who drink wine should aim for about seven glasses a week, with meals. Oh, you can also eat as much chocolate as you like, as long as it's at least 50 percent cocoa.

IS THERE ANYTHING WINE CAN'T DO?

A host of reasons to drink red wine, but please, not 1000 bottles...

...the Yale-New Haven hospital talks up the benefits of the drink, pointing to its effects on heart-health. Researchers included moderate alcohol consumption as one of the "eight proven ways to reduce coronary heart disease risk.

...And the magical powers of wine extend beyond your cardiovascular system. WebMD physician, Arthur Agatston, also touted alcohol's benefits on cholesterol,  telling CBS, "The research evidence points to ethanol, or the alcohol component, of beer, wine, or spirits as the substrate that can help lower cholesterol levels, increase 'good' HDL cholesterol." Studies have also shown that that same ingredient that helps the lazy might also benefit the aging... 

Wine: Kills Oral Bacteria on Contact

Drinking wine can maintain heart healthprevent cancer and even settle a mean case of diarrhea. Research now shows it’s also good for your teeth and throat.According to a new study, a cocktail of compounds found in both red and white wine fights germs that can cause dental plaque as well as sore throats.“Exposure to wine had a persistent antibacterial effect,” the authors wrote in their study, detailed in an upcoming issue of the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. Prior to their research, the authors said the effects of wine against germs found in the mouth hadn’t been studied.Red wines have stronger bacteria-fighting effects than white wine, although not by much. Curiously, the acidity and alcohol isn’t responsible for wine’s germ-fighting properties—instead, it’s a collection of organic (carbon-containing) compounds found in the drink.


Resveratrol Science Hits a Wall

A top resveratrol researcher from Harvard, David Sinclair, found a few years ago that resveratrol may mimic the effect of caloric restriction in humans. This is the only known way to extend life, Das writes in his study. Not to be confused with starvation, which increases metabolism and therefore hastens death, caloric restriction involves controlled limited calorie intake. (It appears to activate a genetic response that extends life when food is scarce, allowing animals to survive until supplies improve and they can reproduce.)

..."Resveratrol is so powerful it can activate stem-cell survival," Dipak Das, a researcher at the University of Connecticut’s Cardiovascular Research Center, said. "So why is it not extending lifespan, by improving the survivability of genes?"...

For whole story go here: http://goo.gl/jpBPS

Escape to Green Wine Country for Earth Day

With more sustainable wine-growing than anywhere else in the world, California is the perfect place to celebrate Earth Day (April 22) this year and throughout the month. The state's winereies are offering many special events showcasing eco-responsible wine-growing and winemaking.

.http://tinyurl.com/3fxkfyc


Saponins, Anyone? Another Chemical in Red Wine Fights Cholesterol

If you enjoy sharing a glass of a nice red wine with friends and family, you may be working on reducing your cholesterol while you're relaxing. Scientists at the University of California, Davis, think that a group of chemicals in red wine, called saponins, are linked to the ability to lower cholesterol. If you have been following the discussions on the French paradox you are already familiar with the link between red wine and reduced risk of heart disease. ..Yet it seems that folks who grow up in France tend to have less clogged arteries and are less obese than Americans or Brits. For years this has been attributed to red wines' health benefits – specifically the compounds catechins and resveratrol, called polyphenols, found in red wine. These chemicals also have antioxidant or anticancer properties.

Andrew Waterhouse, Ph.D., Professor of Enology at UC Davis, an expert in wine chemistry, says that saponins are being found in an increasing number of foods and their presence in wine adds to the mounting evidence that red wine really may make a difference in lowering your cholesterol. "Saponins are a hot new food ingredient. People are just starting to pay attention to it," says Waterhouse. It seems that red wine contains about three to ten times as much saponin as white. This is probably because the saponins are found in the skins of the grapes and red wines have longer contact with their skins in the fermentation process.

The tests showed that the Red Zinfandel has the highest levels of saponins followed by Syrah. Both Pinot Noir and Cabernet Sauvignon had about the same amount. No other red wines were tested, but scientists believe that most red wines contain significant amounts of this chemical.

Holiday drinks: Good cheer, but watch the calories

Whether it's hot buttered rum or spiced apple cider, find out how many calories are in your holiday drink favorites.
Your family's seasonal celebrations may not be complete without festive holiday drinks — mulled red wine, homemade hot cocoa, chilled champagne or creamy eggnog. Because many of these drinks can add extra calories and fat, though, continue to get regular exercise, limit your indulgences and try healthier options when possible. For instance, you can find reduced-fat and sugar-free versions of many drinks, including eggnog and cocoa — and you don't need to feel like a Scrooge for doing it.  So as you serve up a bit of holiday cheer this year, keep in mind these calorie counts.
 
 

Red vs White wine - is there a difference in health benefit?

So why are the antioxidant molecules in white wine apparently more effective than those found in red wines even though they are present in greater numbers in red wines?
The answer lies in the research of Dr. Troup, a physicist at Monash University in Melbourne. Dr. Troup used an electron spin resonance spectroscope to examine the actual size of the various antioxidant molecules in wine and showed that those in white wine are smaller and thus more effective because they can be more easily absorbed.
 
...Returning to the 'French Paradox'. Reynaud observed that the French, despite eating a vascular disease-predisposing cholesterol rich diet, have significantly less coronary heart disease than other similarly indulgent countries. The reason for this, according to Reynaud is due largely to France's high consumption of wine...
 
It has been well documented that consuming alcohol in moderation can reduce mortality from all causes by 30-50% (1) due, mainly, to reducing our society's biggest killer, cardiovascular disease by up to 50% (2) and cancer by up to 24% (3). It is also good for relieving society's other big disease group - stress related illness.
 
 

Is wine good for you? In moderation, a glass or two can help your heart, prevent cancer and more

 
Is wine good for you? In moderation and as part of an overall healthy diet, the short answer is yes! Thanks to its alcohol content and non-alcoholic phytochemicals (natural occurring plant compounds), wine has been shown to reduce the risk of heart disease, certain cancers and slow the progression of neurological degenerative disorders like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Disease.
 
...Non-alcoholic phytochemicals in wine, such as flavanoids and resveratrol, act as antioxidants and prevent molecules known as “free radicals” from causing cellular damage in the body.
 

Red wine and resveratrol: Good for your heart?

 
Red wine, in moderation, has long been thought of as heart healthy. The alcohol and certain substances in red wine called antioxidants may help prevent heart disease by increasing levels of "good" cholesterol and protecting against artery damage.
Antioxidants in red wine called polyphenols may help protect the lining of blood vessels in your heart.
A polyphenol called resveratrol is one substance in red wine that's gotten attention.
How does alcohol help the heart?
Various studies have shown that moderate amounts of all types of alcohol benefit your heart, not just alcohol found in red wine. It's thought that alcohol:
  • Raises high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, the "good" cholesterol
  • Reduces the formation of blood clots
  • Helps prevent artery damage caused by high levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, the "bad" cholesterol
 

Low Alcohol Wine: THE HEALTHY NEW TREND?

More and more European winemakers are starting to look into the idea of making "light" wines -- with 3% to 6% less alcohol content than traditional varieties.

As you can imagine, the wine snobs are turning up their noses at them, but is that fair?

Experts say that such low-alcohol wines taste the same as higher "octane" wines, yet might be healthier for us -- all the fun of a glass of wine, but with less alcohol.